Emerson Education Rhetorical Analysis Essays

Education and Emerson Essay

1350 WordsDec 3rd, 20126 Pages

1. In this essay, Ralph Waldo Emerson describes his view of an ideal education. What are its defining characteristics?
I believe his defining characteristics on his view of an ideal education would have to include the motherly guidance way of education, the teachers working on each student individually and the teachers inspiring the students to think for themselves by giving them encouragement for their thoughts.
2. In what ways is Emerson’s advice appropriate to a child’s first teacher – his or her parents?
Some ways Emerson’s advice is appropriate to a child’s first teacher and his/her parents is the advice of motherly guidance or a guiding hand. A hand that does not punish harshly, rather a hand that encourages a child to do things,…show more content…

6. Emerson refers to educating “a boy” and “a man” and uses masculine pronouns when referring to students. As a reader, does this gender bias affect how receptive you are to Emerson’s ideas?
It may increase receptivity for me because I am a teenage boy but I’m not if it has much of an affect when compared with girls reading this essay. I’m not sure if it matters much.
7. Describe the adult that Emerson imagines would emerge from an education based on the principles he supports.
Emerson probably would imagine an adult that would emerge from an education based on the principles he supports would be hungry for the truth, would look towards the future and learning, would not be afraid to share his ideas but what know for the most part right from wrong, and he would have enthusiasm associated to learning. This adult be it a girl or boy will be a college of knowledge or a wealth of knowledge with their own thoughts and opinions.

1. What does Emerson mean when he says, “Nature loves analogies, but not repetitions” (para.1)?
He means nature loves similarities with distinct differences not the same thing over and over again.
2. Why is the relationship between “Genius and Drill,” as Emerson explains it, paradoxical (para.3)?
It seems pretty self contradictory but it does shed some light on his idea. The child wants to learn more and wants to expand his/her previous unheard

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Paragraph 13 of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s essay titled “Education” contains a number of rhetorical techniques that are effective in various ways. Examples include the following:

  • Allusion. An one point, Emerson alludes to

an eminent reformer, of whom it was said “his patience could see in the bud of the aloe the blossom at the end of a hundred years.”

Although the “reformer” remains unidentified in most editions of Emerson’s essays, Emerson, by citing this...

Paragraph 13 of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s essay titled “Education” contains a number of rhetorical techniques that are effective in various ways. Examples include the following:

  • Allusion. An one point, Emerson alludes to

an eminent reformer, of whom it was said “his patience could see in the bud of the aloe the blossom at the end of a hundred years.”

Although the “reformer” remains unidentified in most editions of Emerson’s essays, Emerson, by citing this authority, gives added weight to his own argument. Emerson implies that he is well read and that he has given serious thought to his topic.

  • Analogy. One effective example of a use of analogy occurs when Emerson writes that a teacher hampered by unruly students “knows as much vice as the judge of a police court.” The comparison of a school (a place for education) and a court (a place for punishment) is memorable and striking, implying that these two places ideally should not resemble each other at all.
  • Imperative sentences. A good example of an imperative sentence occurs when Emerson writes,Try your design on the best school.” This sentence is effective because it is brief; it is blunt; it issues a command rather than merely making a statement; and it directly addresses the reader, thus stimulating the reader’s interest.
  • Rhetorical questions. Emerson uses a rhetorical question when, discussing the frustrations of a teacher pressed for time, he asks, how can he please himself with genius, and foster modest virtue?”

By asking a question rather than making a statement, Emerson encourages his readers to think for themselves, but he also, of course, implies the correct answer. He implicitly gives the reader credit for intelligence and good sense, because he implies that of course the reader will come to the right conclusion. The rhetorical question contributes to the sheer variety of types of sentences that Emerson uses, thus keeping his phrasing from seeming boringly predictable. In this particular case, the rhetorical question stimulates the reader to examine his own conscience and admit his own imperfections.

  • Sentence variety and pacing. Consider the opening sentences of the essay:

So to regard the young child, the young man, requires, no doubt, rare patience: a patience that nothing but faith in the remedial forces of the soul can give [29 words]. You see his sensualism; you see his want of those tastes and perceptions which make the power and safety of your character [22 words]. Very likely [2 words]. But he has something else [5 words].

By creating variety in the length of his sentences, Emerson prevents them from seeming boring or monotonous. He also gives particular weight and emphasis to the short sentences. They seem especially forceful.

All in all, Emerson's use of various rhetoric devices in this essay not only helps make the essays interesting to read but also helps display, by its own example, the advantages of a good education.

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