Email Cover Letter Salutation Human

Your cover letter is more likely to land in the right place when it is addressed to the reader. Unfortunately, many job postings do not include a contact name. When this information is missing, you can use available resources to learn the name of the person responsible for the hiring process. If your search is unsuccessful, there are other effective methods of addressing a blind cover letter. The salutation may be different, but the content follows the standard format for cover letters.

1. Search for a contact name with any information you have. For instance, check the job posting for the company’s name and number, then call and ask for the name of the hiring manager. If the call is unsuccessful, use professional-networking websites, such as LinkedIn and Ryze, to connect with someone who works in the company’s human-resources department.

2. Type your name and contact information at the top of the letter or at the top left corner of the page. Provide the date on the left side of the page, one space beneath your contact information.

3. Leave a blank line beneath the date and type the contact’s name. If you were unable to learn the name, use a general title such as “Hiring Manager,” “Recruiting Representative” or “Human Resources Department.” Provide the company’s address under the name or title.

4. Begin the body of the letter with a salutation to the contact. If you don’t have a name, use a greeting such as “Dear Hiring Manager,” “Dear Recruiting Representative” or “Dear Human Resources Team.”

5. Follow the standard format for the body of your cover letter. In the first paragraph, state the position you are interested in, how you heard about it and why you qualify; briefly highlight relevant key accomplishments in the second paragraph; and indicate how and when you plan to follow up in the last paragraph.

6. End the letter with a closing statement such as “Sincerely” or “Regards.” Leave a blank space beneath the statement for your signature then type your name.

Warning

  • Gender-specific salutations such as “Dear Sir” or “Dear Madam” display a lack of creativity and could be offensive if the greeting is not appropriate for the reader.

About the Author

Tina Amo has been writing business-related content since 2006. Her articles appear on various well-known websites. Amo holds a Bachelor of Science in business administration with a concentration in information systems.

Photo Credits

  • Photos.com/AbleStock.com/Getty Images

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How to Address an Email Cover Letter

Hiring managers get a lot of emails each day. Make it easy for them to scan your email and follow-up by including a clear subject line and a signature with your contact information. It's important to address the email cover letter correctly, including the name of the person hiring for the position if you have a contact, to ensure that your letter gets noticed.

When you're sending an email, it's important to make sure that your cover letter and resume are written as well as any other business correspondence.

If you can, have a friend proofread before you hit send, to pick up any typos or grammatical errors.

How to Address an Email Cover Letter

When you are applying for jobs, you will often need to send your cover letter by email. Read the directions in the job posting carefully, and include the required materials in the requested format. Make sure you pay careful attention to what they ask for, when. Hiring managers have specific practices to follow regarding how they evaluate candidates.

Don’t get yourself knocked out of contention by not including something like a cover letter with your application materials if they ask for one. Here are tips on how to address an email cover letter, including what to do when you don't have the name of a contact, or if you have a contact's name, but are uncertain of person's gender.

Subject Line of Email Message

Never leave the subject line blank. There is a good chance that if a hiring manager receives an email with no subject line, they’ll delete it without even bothering to open it.

Instead, write a clear subject indicating your intentions.

List the job you are applying for in the subject line of your email message, so the employer knows what job you are interested in as well. They may be hiring for multiple positions, and you will want them to identify the position you’re interested in easily.

Addressing the Contact Person

There are a variety of cover letter salutations you can use to address your email message. If you have a contact person at the company, address the letter to Ms. or Mr. Lastname. If you aren’t given a contact person, check to see if you can determine the email recipient's name.

If you can’t find a contact person at the company, you can either leave off the salutation from your cover letter and start with the first paragraph of your letter or use a general salutation.

Employers who responded to a recent employer survey conducted by Saddleback College preferred:

  • Dear Hiring Manager (27%)
  • To Whom It May Concern (17%)
  • Dear Sir/Madam (17%)
  • Dear Human Resources Director (6%)
  • Leave it blank (8%)

Follow the salutation with a colon or comma, and then on the next line start the first paragraph of your letter.

How to Address a Cover Letter for a Non-Gender Specific Name

If you do have a name but aren't sure of the person's gender, an option is to include both the first name and the last name in your salutation:

  • Dear Sydney Smith
  • Dear Taylor Dolan

If possible, it’s a good idea to check LinkedIn, other career networking sites, and the company website to see if you can determine the gender of the contact.

As always, the extra effort is worth it to make your cover letter stand out among the many that the hiring manager will see.

Body of Email Cover Letter

The body of your cover letter lets the employer know what position you are applying for, and why the employer should select you for an interview. This is where you'll sell yourself as a candidate. Review the job posting and include examples of your attributes that closely match the ones they are looking for. When you're sending an email cover letter, it's important to follow the employer's instructions on how to submit your cover letter and resume. ​Make sure that your email cover letters are written as well as any other correspondence you send.

Conclusion

If you have attached your resume, mention it as part of your conclusion. Then finish your cover letter by thanking the employer for considering you for the position.

Include information on how you will follow-up.

Include a closing, then list your name and your email signature.

Signature

Your email signature should include your name, full address, phone number, email address, and LinkedIn Profile URL (if you have one) so it is easy for hiring managers to get in touch.

Firstname Lastname
Street Address
City, State, Zip
Email
Cell
LinkedIn

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