Mark Twain Bibliography Timeline Template

Mark Twain [pseudonym of Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835-1910), quintessential American humorist, lecturer, essayist, and author wrote The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876);

"Tom did play hookey, and he had a very good time. He got back home barely in season to help Jim, the small colored boy, saw next-day's wood and split the kindlings before supper--at least he was there in time to tell his adventures to Jim while Jim did three-fourths of the work. Tom's younger brother (or rather half-brother) Sid was already through with his part of the work (picking up chips), for he was a quiet boy, and had no adventurous, trouble-some ways."--Ch. 1

Protagonist Tom Sawyer is introduced together with his friends Joe Harper and Huck Finn, young boys growing up in the antebellum South. While the novel was initially met with lukewarm enthusiasm, its characters would soon transcend the bounds of their pages and become internationally beloved characters, inspiring numerous other author's works and characters and adaptations to the stage, television, and film. The second novel in his Tom Sawyer adventure series, Huckleberry Finn (1885), was met with outright controversy in Twain's time but is now considered one of the first great American novels. A backdrop of colourful depictions of Southern society and places along the way, Huck Finn, the son of an abusive alcoholic father and Jim, Miss Watson's slave, decide to flee on a raft down the Mississippi river to the free states. Their river raft journey has become an oft-used metaphor of idealistic freedom from oppression, broken family life, racial discrimination, and social injustice. Ernest Hemingway, in The Green Hills of Africa (1934) wrote "All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called "Huckleberry Finn." All American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since."

"We catched fish and talked, and we took a swim now and then to keep off sleepiness. It was kind of solemn, drifting down the big, still river, laying on our backs looking up at the stars, and we didn't ever feel like talking loud, and it warn't often that we laughed—only a little kind of a low chuckle. We had mighty good weather as a general thing, and nothing ever happened to us at all—that night, nor the next, nor the next.."--Ch. 12

Missouri was one of the fifteen slave states when the American Civil War broke out, so Twain grew up amongst the racism, lynch mobs, hangings, and general inhumane oppression of African Americans. He and some friends joined the Confederate side and formed a militia group, the "Marion Rangers", though it disbanded after a few weeks, described in "The Private History of a Campaign That Failed" (1885). His article "The War Prayer" (1923) "in the churches the pastors preached devotion to flag and country, and invoked the God of Battles beseeching His aid in our good cause" is Twain's condemnation of hypocritical patriotic and religious motivations for war. It was not published until after his death because of his family's fear of public outrage. Though he never renounced his Presbyterianism, he wrote other irreligious pieces, some included in his collection of short stories Letters From Earth (1909);

"Man is a marvelous curiosity. When he is at his very, very best he is a sort of low grade nickel-plated angel; at his worst he is unspeakable, unimaginable; and first and last and all the time he is a sarcasm."--"Satan's Letter"

Mark Twain grew to despise the injustice of slavery and any form of senseless violence. He was opposed to vivisection and acted as Vice-President of the American Anti-Imperialist League for nine years. Through his works he illuminates the absurdity of humankind, ironically still at times labeled a racist. Though sometimes caustic, "Of all the creatures that were made he [man] is the most detestable," (Autobiography (1924), Vol. II) as a gifted public speaker he was a much sought after lecturer. "....information appears to stew out of me naturally, like the precious ottar of roses out of the otter." (from his Preface to Roughing It, 1872).

Twain is a master in crafting humorous verse with sardonic wit, and though with biting criticism at times he disarms with his renderings of colloquial speech and unpretentious language. Through the authentic depiction of his times he caused much controversy and many of his works have been suppressed, censored or banned, but even into the Twenty-First Century his works are read the world over by young and old alike. A prolific lecturer and writer even into his seventy-fourth year, he published more than thirty books, hundreds of essays, speeches, articles, reviews, and short stories, many still in print today.

Early Years and Life on the River 1830-1860

Mark Twain was born in Florida, Missouri on 30 November 1835, the sixth child born to Jane Lampton (1803-1890) and John Marshall Clemens (1798-1847). In 1839 the Twain family moved to their Hill Street home, now the Mark Twain Boyhood Home and Museum with its famous whitewashed fence, in the bustling port city of Hannibal, Missouri. Situated on the banks of the Mississippi river it would later provide a model for the fictitious town of St. Petersburg in Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer.

When Twain's father died in 1847 the family was left in financial straits, so eleven year old Samuel left school (he was in grade 5) and obtained his first of many jobs working with various newspapers and magazines including the Hannibal Courier as journeyman printer. He also started writing, among his first stories "A Gallant Fireman" (1851) and "The Dandy Frightening the Squatter" (1852). After traveling to and working in New York and Philadelphia for a few years he moved back to St. Louis in 1857. It was here that the lure of the elegant steamboats and festive crowds drew his attention and he became an apprentice 'cub' river pilot under Horace Bixby, earning his license in 1858. As a successful pilot plying his trade between St. Louis and New Orleans, Twain also grew to love the second longest river in the world which he describes affectionately in his memoir Life on the Mississippi (1883);

"The face of the water, in time, became a wonderful book — a book that was a dead language to the uneducated passenger, but which told its mind to me without reserve, delivering its most cherished secrets as clearly as if it uttered them with a voice. And it was not a book to be read once and thrown aside, for it had a new story to tell every day."--Ch. 9

An important part of a river pilot's craft is knowing the waters and depths, which, for the mighty Mississippi and her reefs, snags, and mud are ever changing. To 'mark twain' is to sound the depths and deem them safe for passage, the term adopted by Clemens as his pen name in 1863. In 1858 his brother Henry died in an explosion on the steamboat Pennsylvania. Life on the river would provide much fodder for Twain's future works that are at times mystical, often sardonic and witty, always invaluable as insight into the human condition.

Beyond the Banks in the 1860's

With the outbreak of Civil War in 1861 passage on the Mississippi was limited, so at the age of twenty-six Twain moved on from river life to the high desert valley in the silver mining town of Carson City, Nevada with his brother Orion, who had just been appointed Secretary of the Nevada Territory. He had never traveled out of the state but was excited to venture forth on the stagecoach in the days before railways, described in his semi-autobiographical novel Roughing It (1872). Twain tried his hand at mining on Jackass Hill in California in 1864, and also began a prolific period of reporting for numerous publications including the Territorial Enterprise, The Alta Californian, San Francisco Morning Call, Sacramento Union and The Galaxy. He traveled to various cities in America, met authors Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Charles Dickens in New York, and visited various countries in Europe, Hawaii, and the Holy Land which he based Innocents Abroad (1869) on. Short stories from this period include "Advice For Little Girls" (1867) and "The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calavaras County" (1867).

Marriage, Tramping Abroad, and Success

In 1870 Twain married Olivia 'Livy' Langdon (1845-1904) with whom he would have four children. Three died before they reached their twenties but Clara (1874-1962) lived to the age of eighty-eight. The Twain's home base was now Hartford, Connecticut, where in 1874 Twain built a home, though they traveled often. Apart from numerous short stories he wrote during this time and Tom Sawyer, Twain also collaborated on The Gilded Age (1873) with Charles Dudley Warner.

A Tramp Abroad (1880), Twain's non-fiction satirical look at his trip through Germany, Italy, and the Alps and somewhat of a sequel to Innocents Abroad was followed by The Prince and the Pauper (1882). Hank Morgan, time traveler in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (1889) reflects Twain's friendship with pioneering inventor and electrical engineer Nikola Tesla and interest in scientific inventions. Twain also continued to uphold a busy lecture series throughout the United States. In 1888 he was awarded an honorary Master of Art degree from Yale University.

For some years Twain had lost money in various money making schemes like mining, printing machines, the Charles L. Webster Publishing Co., and The Mark Twain Self-Pasting Scrap Book, though he never lost his sense of humour. In 1892, friend and fellow humorist and author Robert Barr, writing as 'Luke Sharp' interviewed Twain for The Idler magazine that he owned with Jerome K. Jerome. Twain's novel The American Claimant (1892) was followed by The Tragedy of Pudd'Nhead Wilson (1894), first serialized in Century Magazine. Tom Sawyer Abroad (1894) was followed by Tom Sawyer, Detective in 1896. His favourite fiction novel, Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (1896) was first serialised in Harper's Magazine. By 1895, unable to control his debts, he set off on a world lecture tour to Australia, Canada, Ceylon, India, New Zealand, and South Africa to pay them off. Following the Equator (1897) is his travelogue based on his tour, during which he met Mahatma Gandhi, Sigmund Freud, and Booker T. Washington.

With another successful lecture tour under his belt and now much admired and celebrated for his literary efforts, Mark, Livy and their daughter Jane settled in New York City. Yale University bestowed upon him an honorary Doctor of Letters degree in 1901. In 1907 he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Letters by Oxford University. The same year A Horse's Tale and Christian Science (1907) were published. While traveling in Italy in 1904, Livy died in Florence. For Twain's 70th birthday on 30 November 1905 he was fêted at Delmonico's restaurant in New York, where he delivered his famous birthday speech, wearing his trademark all-year round white suit. That year he was also a guest of American President Theodore 'Teddy' Roosevelt at the White House and addressed the congressional committee on copyright issues. He was also working on his biography with Albert Bigelow Paine. His daughter Jane became very sick and was committed to an institution, but died in 1909 of an epileptic seizure. In 1908 Twain had moved to his home 'Stormfield' in Redding, Connecticut, though he still actively traveled, especially to Bermuda.

Mark Twain died on 21 April 1910 in Redding, Connecticut, and now rests in the Woodlawn Cemetery in Livy's hometown of Elmira, New York State, buried beside her and the children. A memorial statue and cenotaph in the Eternal Valley Memorial Park of Los Angeles, California states: "Beloved Author, Humorist, and Western Pioneer, This Original Marble Statue Is The Creation Of The Renowned Italian Sculptor Spartaco Palla Of Pietrasanta." Twain suffered many losses in his life including the deaths of three of his children, and accumulated large debts which plagued him for many years, but at the time of his death he had grown to mythic proportions as the voice of a spirited and diverse nation. Keen observer and dutiful reporter, Twain was born when Halley's Comet was visible in the skies and as he predicted, it was back in the skies when he died.

"Ah, if he could only die temporarily!"--The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Ch. 8

Biography written by C.D. Merriman for Jalic Inc. Copyright Jalic Inc. 2006. All Rights Reserved.

The above biography is copyrighted. Do not republish it without permission.

Forum Discussions on Mark Twain

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Here is an new and exciting Mark Twain project I would like to draw your attention to: the book "Mark Twain in Berlin". It tells the story of the great American writer’s 1891-1892 sojourn in Berlin during which he turned his eye on the Kaiser (with whom he had dinner) ,Schopenhauer, and his noisy apartment. Twain, who became a celebrity, experienced many adventures. He witnessed an uprising, had a run-in with the police for “insubordination,” and nearly died of pneumonia. Twain called Berlin “the Chicago of Europe,” which is also the title of a newspaper story included in this book. Also included are a number of Twain’s never before published articles about Berlin. The book will be publis...

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Quotations | Newspaper Articles | Special Features | Links | Search

SPECIAL FEATURE


Twain by Joseph Keppler appeared on the back cover of PUCK, Dec. 23, 1885.
From the Dave Thomson collection

CHRONOLOGY OF KNOWN MARK TWAIN SPEECHES, PUBLIC READINGS, AND LECTURES

by
Barbara Schmidt

Documenting all of Mark Twain's known public speeches, readings and lectures is a monumental undertaking first attempted by Paul Fatout in his classic volume MARK TWAIN SPEAKING published by University of Iowa Press, 1976. Fatout's listing has been updated at least once by noted Twain scholar Louis Budd in "A Supplement to 'A Chronology' in MARK TWAIN SPEAKING" published in Essays in Arts and Sciences, Vol. XXIX, October 2000, pp. 57-68. Various other scholars have attempted to document all the towns and cities Twain lectured in during his numerous lecture tours around the United States and the world. As more and more of Mark Twain's letters are published and more and more historical newspaper databases become searchable in digital format, it becomes increasingly apparent that no list of Twain's known speeches will likely be complete. While texts of some of Twain's major speeches do survive, many have never been recovered. For Twain's cross country and multiple continent lecture tours, he may have lectured on a particular topic but fine-tuned his speech or public readings to meet the needs of his particular locale. Many local reviews of Twain's appearances have been collected and are online at Stephen Railton's website at the University of Virginia. Many versions of one speech existed, but only one version may have been collected and published. The following index is a compilation of all known previously published lists currently available. It includes references to publications where texts of Twain's speeches can be found. Additional listings not in the collected edition of MARK TWAIN SPEAKING, or which are corrections to previously published sources, are byBarbara Schmidtand appear in redtext. A bibliography of sources appears at the end of this document.

In December 2012 the Mark Twain Project at the University of California, Berkeley, published online an exhibit model featuring timelines and maps of some of these known speeches and lectures that occurred between 1866-1908 and included citations for historical newspaper reports for many speeches. That resource can be accessed at Mark Twain on the Platform.


1856
January 17 - Printers Banquet, Keokuk, Iowa - Impromptu remarks - text not available
See Fred W. Lorch, "Mark Twain in Iowa," Iowa Journal of History and Politics 27, no. 3 July 1929) pages 420-21; also mentioned in Mark Twain: A Biography, Vol. 1, by Albert Bigelow Paine, p. 107.

1863
July 8 - Collins House Opening, Virginia City, Nevada - Speech - text not available
A new hotel called for toasts, proposed by Tom Fitch, Rollin M. Daggett, Colonel Turner, Judge Ferris, and others. According to the next day's Virginia City Evening Bulletin, "Perhaps the speech of the evening was made by Sam Clemens. He almost brought the house to tears by his touching simple pathos."

October (?) - Eagle Fire Company Celebration, Virginia City, Nevada - Speech - text not available

November (?) - Meerschaum Pipe Presentation, Virginia City, Nevada - Speech - text not available
According to Paul Fatout, at a convivial get together, several of Mark Twain's friends gave him a handsome, but fake, meerschaum pipe. Before discovering the hoax, he made an elaborate speech of thanks, which began, said Dan De Quille, "with the introduction of tobacco into England by Sir Walter Raleigh, and wound up with George Washington." See "Reporting With Mark Twain," California Illustrated, July 1893, pp. 170-78.

December 11 - Third House, Carson City, Nevada - Remarks as President - text not available
Unanimously elected president of the Third House, Mark Twain presided at a turbulent session, of which he wrote an exaggerated account for the Virginia Territorial Enterprise. See Mark Twain of the Enterprise, ed. Henry Nash Smith and Frederick Anderson (Berkeley, 1957) pages 102-10.
Online at: http://www.twainquotes.com/18631213t.html

1864
January 27 - Court House, Carson City, Nevada - "Third Annual Message" - text not available
See Mark Twain's description of the speech in his article to the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise.

June 12 - Maguire's Opera House, San Francisco, California - Presentation Speech.
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 1-2.

1866
October 2 - Maguire's Opera House, San Francisco, California - "Sandwich Islands"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 4-15.

October 11 - November 27 - Lecture Tour in California and Nevada. "Sandwich Islands"
16 engagements. Partially managed by Denis McCarthy.
One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 4-15.
Also see Steve Railton's website at the University of Virginia for more details on this tour including map and reviews.
Towns and cities on the tour included:

October 11 - Sacramento, California
October 15 - Marysville, California
October 20 - Grass Valley, California
October 23 - Nevada City, California
October 24 - Red Dog, California
October 25 - You Bet, California
October 31 - Maguire's Opera House, Virginia City, Nevada
November 3 - Carson City, Nevada
November 7 - Washoe City, Nevada
November 8 - Dayton, Nevada
November 9 - Silver City, Nevada
November 10 - Gold Hill, Theatre, Gold Hill, Nevada (SLC was the victim of a robbery prank after this lecture)
November 16 - Platt's Hall, San Francisco, California
November 21 - Armory Hall, San Jose, California (location source is from San Francisco Bulletin, November 20, 1866, p. 5.)
November 26 - Petaluma, California
November 27 - College Hall, Twelfth Street, Oakland, California (location source is from San Francisco Bulletin, November 26, 1866, p. 5.)

December 10 - Congress Hall, San Francisco, California - "Sandwich Islands"
One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 4-15.

1867
March 17 - Sunday School, Carondelet, St. Louis, Missouri - "Jim Smiley's Jumping Frog"
Mentioned in a letter to the San Francisco Alta California published May 19, 1867.

March 25 - April 9 - Midwest Lecture Tour: 5 engagements - "Sandwich Islands"
One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 4-15.
Also see Steve Railton's website at the University of Virginia for more details of this tour including map.

March 25 - Mercantile Library Hall, St. Louis, Missouri
March 26 - Mercantile Library Hall, St. Louis, Missouri
April 2 - Brittingham Hall, Hannibal, Missouri
Brittingham Hall was better known as the Avery Burch Building. Built as an opera house and meeting hall in 1859 by the Brittingham Brothers who had a thriving drug store, the building had a rich history over the next century. It was used as a military hospital and possibly a prison during the Civil War.
April 8 - Chatham Sq. Methodist Church, Keokuk, Iowa
April 9 - National Hall, Quincy, Illinois

May 6 - Cooper Institute, New York City - "Sandwich Islands"
For more information on this appearance see "Frank Fuller, The American, Revisited," online at this site.
One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 4-15.

May 10 - Athenaeum, Brooklyn, New York - "Sandwich Islands"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 4-15.

May 15 - Irving Hall, New York City - "Sandwich Islands"
One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 4-15.

August 25 - Yalta, Russia - "Address to the Czar"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 18-19.

1868
January 9
- Metzerott Hall, Washington, D.C. "The Frozen Truth" - an account of the Quaker City voyage - only a partial text survives
The Washington Morning Chronicle, January 11, 1868 reported: "The subject of his remarks was the recent trip of a party of excursionists on the steamship Quaker City to Europe and points on the Mediterranean, and his descriptions were replete with sparkling wit, to which his slow, deliberate style of speaking gave a peculiar charm." The complete text of a review in the Washington Star of January 10 is reprinted in Fred Lorch's The Trouble Begins at Eight, pp. 71-73.

January 11 - Newspaper Correspondents Dinner, Welcker's Restaurtant, Washington, D. C - "Woman"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 20-21.
For Mark Twain's comments on this speech, see his letters from Washington published in the Alta, January 28, 1868 and February 19, 1868.

February 14 - Society of Good Fellows, Washington, D. C."Woman," revised - no complete surviving text has been found
Mentioned in a letter Twain wrote to the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise and published on March 7, 1868.

February 22 - Ladies' Union Benevolent Society, Forrest Hall, Georgetown (Washington, DC) - "Sandwich Islands" - with some variations.
See Lorch's The Trouble Begins at Eight, p. 73 and Fatout's Mark Twain on the Lecture Circuit, p. 86.

March (?) - S.S. Sacramento, at sea. "Charade" - text not available

April 6 - Literary Society of Rev. Charles Wadsworth's Calvary Presbyterian Church, San Francisco, California - Informal speech - text not available
See Mark Twain's Letters, Volume 2, 1867-1868, p. 206.

April 9 - Methodist Episcopal Church, Oakland, California - text not available
See Mark Twain's Letters, Volume 2, 1867-1868, p. 206.

April 14 and 15 - Platt's Hall, San Francisco, California - "The Frozen Truth" - an account of the Quaker City voyage - only a partial text survives

April 17 - 29 - Lecture Tour, California and Nevada: at least 7 engagements - "Pilgrim Life"
One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 23-24.
Also see Steve Railton's website at the University of Virginia for more details of this tour including map and publicity.

April 17 - Metropolitan Theater, Sacramento, California
April 18 - Marysville, California
April 20 - Nevada City, California
April 21 - Grass Valley, California
April 27 and 28 - Piper's Opera House, Virginia City, Nevada
April 29 - Carson City, Nevada

April 30 - School Benefit, Carson City, Nevada - "Sandwich Islands"
One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 4-15.

July 2 - Mercantile Library, San Francisco, California - "Venice, Past and Present" - no surviving complete text
Partial text, the introduction, published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 25-26. Summary from the Alta California reprinted in Lorch's The Trouble Begins at Eight, p. 83.

July 10 - S.S. Montana, at sea. "Composition--the Cow" - text not available
The shipboard program was called "Country School Exhibition." See Mark Twain's letter to the Alta California, September 6, 1868.

November 17 - March 3, 1869 Eastern Lecture Tour: at least 43 engagements - "The American Vandal Abroad"
One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 27-36.
Also see Steve Railton's website at the University of Virginia for more details of this tour including map.
Partially managed by G. L. Torbert and by Clemens himself, the following cities were on the Eastern Lecture Tour:

November 17 - Case Hall, Cleveland, Ohio
November 19 - Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
November 23 - Opera House, Elmira, New York
December 2 - Washington Hall, Rondout, New York
December 9 - Opera House, Newark, New Jersey
December 11 - Norwich, New York
December 16 - Scranton, Pennsylvania
December 19 - Fort Plain, New York
December 22 - Young Men's Hall, Detroit, Michigan
December 23 - Lansing, Michigan
December 25 - Charlotte, Michigan
December 26 - Tecumseh, Michigan
December 30 - Methodist Church, Akron, Ohio

1869

January 2 - Hamilton's Hall, Fort Wayne, Indiana
January 4 - The Metropolitan, Indianapolis, Indiana
January 6 - Brown's Hall, Rockford, Illinois
January 7 - Library Hall, Chicago, Illinois
January 8 - Hardin's Hall, Monmouth, Illinois
January 9 - Galesburg, Illinois
January 11 - Rouse's Opera House, Peoria, Illinois
January 12 - Powers' Hall, Decatur, Illinois
January 13 - Methodist Episcopal Church, Ottawa, Illinois
January 14 - Burtis Opera House, Davenport, Iowa
January 15 - Metropolitan Hall, Iowa City, Iowa
January 20 - White's Hall, Toledo, Ohio
January 21 - Whittlesey Hall, Norwalk, Ohio

January 22 - Protestant Orphan Asylum Benefit, Case Hall, Cleveland, Ohio - "The American Vandal Abroad"
Plus concluding remarks published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 37-38.

January 25 - Academy of Music, Marshall, Michigan
January 26 - Batavia, Illinois
January 27 - Fry's Hall, Freeport, Illinois
January 28 - Russell Hall, Waterloo, Iowa
January 29 - Bench St. Methodist Church, Galena, Illinois
February 1 - Strawn's Hall, Jacksonville, Illinois
February 13 - Ravenna, Ohio
February 15 - Alliance, Ohio
February 16 - Corinthian Hall, Titusville, Pennsylvania
February 17 - Franklin, Pennsylvania
February 23 - Taylor Hall, Trenton, New Jersey
February 25 - Stuyvesant, New York
March 1 - Concert Hall, Geneseo, New York
March 3 - Arcade Hall, Lockport, New York
March 16 - Newtown, New York
March 20 - Sharon, Pennsylvania

June 5 - Press Club Dinner, New York City - "Reliable Contraband"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 38-40.

November 1 - January 21, 1870 Lecture Tour: At least 49 engagements - "Our Fellow Savages of the Sandwich Islands"
One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 4-15.
Also see Steve Railton's web site at the University of Virginia for more details on on this tour.
Under the management of James Redpath, the following cities were on the tour:

November 1 - Academy of Music, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
November 9 - Harrington's Opera House, Providence, Rhode Island
November 10 - Music Hall, Boston, Massachusetts
November 11 - Trinity Church, Charlestown, Massachusetts
November 13 - Norwich, Connecticut
November 15 - Clinton Hall, Clinton, Massachusetts
November 16 - Holyoke, Massachusetts
November 17 - Gothic Hall, Danvers, Massachusetts
November 19 - Town Hall, Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts
November 23 - Allyn Hall, Hartford, Connecticut
November 26 - Unidentified town (mentioned in a letter from SLC to Olivia Clemens)
November 29 - Congregational Church, Newtonville, Massachusetts
November 30 - Thompsonville, Connecticut
December 1 - Brooklyn Library Society, Brooklyn, New York
December 3 - Collingwood's Opera House, Poughkeepsie, New York
December 6 - Beecher's Plymouth Church, Brooklyn, New York
December 7 - Academy of Music, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
December 8 - Lincoln Hall, Washington, D. C.
December 9 - Germantown, Pennsylvania
December 10 - Methodist Church, Mount Vernon, New York
December 11 - Town Hall, West Meriden, Connecticut
December 13 - Union Hall, New Britain, Connecticut
December 14 - Warren, Massachusetts
December 15 - Armory Hall, Pawtucket, Rhode Island
December 16 - Rumford Institute, Waltham, Massachusetts
December 20 - Canton, Massachusetts
December 21 - Hudson, Massachusetts
December 22 - Mercantile Library, Portland, Maine
December 23 - Town Hall, Rockport, Massachusetts
December 24 - Slatersville, Rhode Island
December 27 - Music Hall, New Haven, Connecticut
December 28 - Taylor Hall, Trenton, New Jersey
December 29 - Opera House, Newark, New Jersey
December 30 - Landmesser Hall, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania
December 31 - Opera House, Williamsport, Pennsylvania

1870

January 4 - Wilson Hall, Oswego, New York
January 6 - Amenia, New York
January 7 - Egberts Hall, Cohoes, New York
January 10 - Tweddle Hall, Albany, New York
January 11 - Union Place Hall, West Troy, New York
January 12 - Rondout, New York
January 13 - Hubbard Hall, Cambridge, New York
January 14 - Mechanic's Hall, Utica, New York
January 15 - Doolittle Hall , Oswego, New York
January 17 - First Methodist Church, Baldwinsville, New York
January 18 - Ogdensburg, New York
January 19 - Normal School Chapel, Fredonia, New York
January 20 - Hornell Library, Hornellsville, New York
January 21 - Institute Hall, Jamestown, New York

From Budd's update:
June 23 - Female Academy, Buffalo, New York - Commencement Exercises Speech.
See Mark Twain at the "Buffalo Express" ed. McCullough and McIntire-Strasburg, pp. 211-115. Text states Clemens wrote the speech but it was read by David Gray.

1871
October 16 - February 27, 1872
, Lecture tour, at least 77 engagements included three different speeches.
Also see Steve Railton's web site at the University of Virginia for more details on this tour including map, ads and reviews.
Under the management of James Redpath, the following cities were on the tour:

October 16 - Moravian Day School Hall, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. "Uncommonplace Characters" - text not available
October 17 - Opera House, Allentown, Pennsylvania. "Uncommonplace Characters" - text not available
October 18 - Music Hall, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. "Uncommonplace Characters" - text not available

October 23 - Lincoln Hall, Washington, D. C. - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
October 24 - Institute Hall, Wilmington, Delaware - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
October 25 - Odd Fellows Hall, Norristown, Pennsylvania - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
October 27 - Sumner Hall, Great Barrington, Massachusetts - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
October 30 - Brattleboro, Vermont - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
October 31 - Milford, Massachusetts - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
November 1 - Music Hall, Boston, Massachusetts - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
November 2 - Town Hall, Exeter, New Hampshire - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
November 3 - Andover, Massachusetts - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
November 6 - Town Hall, Malden, Massachusetts - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
November 8 - Allyn Hall, Hartford, Connecticut - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
November 9 - Mechanics Hall, Worcester, Massachusetts - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
November 10 - Stetson Hall, Randolph, Massachusetts - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.

November 11- Boston, Massachusetts, Boston Press Club - Speech summarized in Providence (RI) Evening Press, November 14, 1871, p. 3, "Letter From Boston / The Press Club Dinner.".Content described is largely from the "Roughing It" lecture.Newspaper article recovered by Leslie Myrick of the Mark Twain Project at Berkeley.

November 13 - Mechanic's Hall, Boston, Massachusetts - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
November 14 - Smyth's Hall, Manchester, New Hampshire - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
November 15 - City Hall, Haverhill, Massachusetts - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
November 16 - City Hall, Portland, Maine - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
November 17 - Huntington Hall, Lowell, Massachusetts - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
November 20 - Academy of Music, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
November 21 - Plymouth Church, Brooklyn, New York - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
November 22 - Washington Hall, Roundout, New York - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
November 23 - Court House, Easton, Pennsylvania - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
November 24 - Keystone Opera House, Reading, Pennsylvania - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
November 27 - Bennington, Vermont - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
November 28 - Tweddle Hall, Albany, New York - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
November 29 - Opera House, Newark, New Jersey - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
December 1 - Doolittle Hall, Oswego, New York - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
December 2 - Barber Hall, Homer, New York - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
December 4 - Linden Hall, Geneva, New York - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
December 5 - Academy of Music, Auburn, New York - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
December 6 - Wieting Opera House, Syracuse, New York - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.

December 7 - Sprague's Hall, Warsaw, New York - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
December 8 - Union Hall, Fredonia, New York - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.

December 9 - Farrar Hall, Erie, Pennsylvania - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
December 11 - White's Hall, Toledo, Ohio - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
December 12 - University Hall, Ann Arbor, Michigan - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
December 13 - Union Hall, Jackson, Michigan - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.

December 14 - Mead's Hall, Lansing, Michigan - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
December 15 - Luce's Hall, Grand Rapids, Michigan - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
December 16 - Union Hall, Kalamazoo, Michigan - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
December 18 - Michigan Avenue Baptist Church, Chicago, Illinois - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
December 19 - Union Park Congregational Church, Chicago, Illinois - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.

December 20 - Sandwich, Illinois - Topic unknown - text not available
December 21 - City Hall, Aurora, Illinois - Topic unknown - text not available

December 22 - Patterson Hall, Princeton, Illinois - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
December 26 - Barrett Hall, Champaign, Illinois - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
December 27 - Tuscola, Illinois - "Artemus Ward" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 41-47.
See Mark Twain's Letters: Volume 4 (1870-1871) p. 525: "Lectured on Ward tonight."

December 28 - Lincoln Hall, Danville, Illinois - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.

December 29 - Mattoon, Illinois - Topic unknown - text not available
December 30 - Paris, Illinois - Topic unknown - text not available

1872

January 1 - Association Hall, Indianapolis, Indiana - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
January 2 - Opera House, Logansport, Indiana - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
January 3 - Richmond, Indiana - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
January 4 - Music Hall, Dayton, Ohio - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
January 5 - Opera House, Columbus, Ohio - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
January 6 - Arcadome Hall, Wooster, Ohio - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
January 8 - Concert Hall, Salem, Ohio - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
January 9 - Gray and Garrett's Hall, Steubenville, Ohio - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
January 10 - Washington Hall, Wheeling, West Virginia - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
January 11 - Mercantile Library Hall, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
January 12 - Kittanning, Pennsylvania - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
January 16 - Opera House, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
January 17 - Milton, Pennsylvania - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
January 18 - Court House, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
January 19 - Fulton Opera House, Lancaster, Pennsylvania - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
January 22 - Old Methodist Church, Carlisle, Pennsylvania - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
January 23 - Maryland Institute, Baltimore, Maryland - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
January 24 - Steinway Hall, New York, New York - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
January 29 - Klein's Opera House, Scranton, Pennsylvania - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
January 30 - The Tabernacle, Jersey City, New Jersey - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
January 31 - Opera House, Paterson, New Jersey - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
February 1 - Rand's Hall, Troy, New York - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.
February 21 - Opera House, Danbury, Connecticut - "Roughing It" - One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.

February 23 - The Aldine Dinner, St. James Hotel, New York City - Dinner Speech.
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 65-68.
From Budd's update:
Mark Twain's Letters: Volume 5 (1872-1873), pp. 47-48 gives sources for other texts. Also, the Chicago Tribune, 2 March 1872, p. 5, gives a long text.

February 27 - College Hall, Amherst, Massachusetts - "Roughing It"
One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.

September 6 - Whitefriars Club, London, England - Dinner Speech.
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 72-73.

September 21 - Savage Club, London, England - Dinner Speech
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 69-71.

September 28 Sheriffs Dinner, Guildhall, London - Response to a toast "Success to Literature" - text not available
The dinner was given by the new sheriffs of London to the city guilds and liverymen. When one of the sheriffs proposed the health of Mark Twain, he was applauded, then responded to the toast. The London Times, September 30, 1872, called it "an amusing speech." See Love Letters of Mark Twain, edited by Dixon Wecter (Harper & Bros., 1949), pp.178-79.

1873
January 31 - Benefit for Father Hawley, Allyn Hall, Hartford, Connecticut - "Sandwich Islands"
In a letter to the Hartford Courant, January 29, 1873, Mark Twain said that charity is "a dignified and respectworthy thing, and there is small merit about it and less grace when it don't cost anything. We would like to have a thousand dollars in the house; we point to the snow and the thermometer; we call Hartford by name, and we are not much afraid but that she will step to the front and answer for herself.... I am thoroughly and cheerfully willing to lecture here for such an object, though I would have serious objections to talking in my own town for the benefit of my own pocket--we freebooters of the platform consider it more graceful to fly the black flag in strange waters and prey upon remote and friendless communities." All services having been donated, the benefit netted $1,500 for Father Hawley.
One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 4-15.

February 1 - Lotos Club, New York City - Speech
Remarks summarized in Mark Twain's Letters, Vol. 5, p. 292 which references text from John Elderkin, A Brief History of the Lotos Club (New York: Club House, 1895), pp. 15-16 for a page summary.

February 5 - Steinway Hall, New York City - "Sandwich Islands"
One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 4-15.
Review in The New York Times.

February 7 - Academy of Music, Brooklyn, New York - "Sandwich Islands"
One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 4-15.

February 10 - Steinway Hall, New York City - "Sandwich Islands"
One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 4-15.

February 13 - Jersey City, New Jersey - "Sandwich Islands"
One version of this speech is published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 4-15.
Mentioned in Mark Twain's Letters, Vol. 5, p. 295.

March 31 - Monday Evening Club, Hartford, Connecticut - "License of the Press"
Published in Mark Twain: Collected Tales, Sketches, Speeches, & Essays, edited by Louis J. Budd, (Library of America: 1992), pp. 551-555.

July 4 - Meeting of Americans, London, England - Dinner Speech.
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 74-76.

Lectures arranged under the management of George Dolby:
October 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18
- Queen's Concert Rooms, Hanover Square, London, England - "Sandwich Islands"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 4-15.

October 20 - Liverpool Institute, Liverpool, England - "Sandwich Islands"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 4-15.

November 29 - St. Andrew's Society, Salutation Tavern, London, England - "The Guests"
Published in Mark Twain's Letters, Volume 5,1872-1873, p. 491.
Also in Hartford Daily Courant, "Mark Twain on Scotland," December 20, 1873, p. 2.

Lectures arranged under the management of George Dolby:
December 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
- Queen's Concert Rooms, Hanover Square, London, England - "Sandwich Islands"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 4-15.

December 1 - Scottish Corporation, London, England - "The Ladies"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 78-80.

Lectures arranged under the management of George Dolby:
December 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20
- Queen's Concert Rooms, London, England - "Roughing It"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.

December 12 - Scotch Morayshire Dinner, London, England - Dinner Speech - "The Visitors" - text not available
Paraphrased in Mark Twain's Letters, Volume 5,1872-1873, p 509-510.

December 22 - Small gathering, London, England. Dinner Speech - short remarks
Paraphrased in Mark Twain's Letters, Volume 5,1872-1873, p 526.

1874
January 8 - Leicester, England - "Roughing It" - Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.

January 9 - Liverpool Institute, Liverpool, England - "Roughing It" - Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.

January 10 - Liverpool Institute, Liverpool, England - "Sandwich Islands" and "Jumping Frog"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 4-15.

February 16 - Wilkie Collins Dinner, Boston, Massachusetts - Dinner Speech. - text not available
The Boston Transcript said, February 17, 1874: "Mark Twain gave a brief description of his reception in England, saying that he was very successful in the object of his visit there, which was to teach people good morals, and to introduce some of the improvements of the present century."

February 17- Tremont Temple, Boston, Massachusetts - Introducing Charles Kingsley.
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 83-83. Misidentified and misdated by Fatout as taking place in Salem, Massachusetts on February 14.

February 17 - Massachusetts Press Association Dinner, Boston, Massachusetts - Dinner Speech.
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 85-87.

March 5 - Horticultural Hall, Boston, Massachusetts - "Roughing It"
See Mark Twain's Letters, Volume 6, p. 58, 60 for press comments.

September 16 - Opening of the play The Gilded Age, Park Theatre, New York City - Curtain Speech.
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 87-89.

October 12 - Insurance Men's Banquet for Cornelius Walford, Allyn House, Hartford, Connecticut - Dinner Speech.
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 89-91.

December 15 - Atlantic Dinner, Boston, Massachusetts. Dinner Speech - text not available
Howells was toastmaster, and among those present were Aldrich, Holmes, George Cary Eggleston, and Henry James. The Boston Transcript, December 16, 1874, calling Mark Twain's speech one of the brightest of the evening, summarized his remarks: "once when sailing on the blue Mediterranean ... he tried to give the impression that he was a poet. He said no one believed him, and after repeated protestations he rashly laid a wager of ten to one that he could get a poem printed in the Atlantic. The poem was forwarded from Gibraltar, the bet was ten dollars to a hundred, which accounts, Mark said, for the fact that he had only three dollars in his pocket when he reached here. A subsequent anecdote related by him and Mr. Osgood jointly, proved that Mark was more at home in a game called 'euchre' than in poetry, and Mr. Osgood assured the company that it was not a safe practice to play cards with Mark Twain." See Arthur Gilman, "Atlantic Dinners and Diners," Atlantic Monthly 100, no. 5 (November 1907) pp. 646-67.

December 23 - One hundredth performance of The Gilded Age, Park Theatre, New York City - Curtain Speech.
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 92-93.
Also in The New York Times, December 24, 1874

1875
February 15
- Monday Evening Club, Hartford, Connecticut - "Universal Suffrage"
For a portion of the text see Albert Bigelow Paine, Mark Twain: A Biography, p. 541.

March 5 - For Father David Hawley, Roberts' Opera House, Hartford, Connecticut - "Roughing It"
One version of this speech published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 48-63.

April 7 - Connecticut Retreat for the Insane, Washington Street, Hartford, Connecticut - "Roughing It"
Icon notes for this speech published in Mark Twain's Letters, Volume 6, p. 405.

May 12 - Asylum Hill Church, Hartford, Connecticut - Introducing Spelling Match.
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 94-96.
Also:"Mark Twain's Spelling Match Speech," by Harriet Elinor Smith and Michael B. Frank,
The Southern Quarterly, A Journal of the Arts in the South, Volume 41, Number 1, Fall 2002, pages 5-9.

From Budd's update:
Mid-August - Castle Hill, Newport, Rhode Island, Town and Country Club picnic - Speech - text not available
See John Roche, "Mark Twain in Newport," Mark Twain Journal, 25 (Fall 1987) 23-27.

From Budd's update:
August 23 - Bellevue Dramatic Group, Opera House Newport, Rhode Island - readings "How I Edited an Agriculture Paper" and from Roughing It
See John Roche, "Mark Twain in Newport," Mark Twain Journal, 25 (Fall 1987) 23-27.

November 12 - Dramatic Association Speech, Hartford, Connecticut - paraphrase available
This speech was paraphrased in the Hartford Courant, 13 November 1875, p. 2.
See Mark Twain's Letters, vol. 6, 1874 - 1875, p. 590.
<http://www.marktwainproject.org/xtf/view?docId=letters/MTLN00142.xml;style=letter;brand=mtp>

December 21 - Asylum Hill Church, Hartford, Connecticut - Readings - text not available
The Hartford Courant of Thursday, December 16, 1875, p. 1 in an article titled "Christ Church Choir and Mark Twain" reported that Twain had agreed to give some readings for benevolence on the following Tuesday..

1876
January 24 - Monday Evening Club, Hartford, Connecticut - Reading - "Recent Carnival of Crime in Connecticut"

The following March 1876 lectures were to benefit John Brown, a friend--the Edinburgh author and physician whom the Clemenses had met in 1873. Brown's friends were quietly raising a fund that would enable him to retire from the stresses of his medical practice:

March 22 - Kent Club, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut - "Roughing It"
See SLC to James Redpath, 17 March 1876., Hartford, Conn. (UCCL 01314), n. 1. 2007. <http://www.marktwainproject.org/xtf/view?docId=letters/UCCL01314.xml;style=letter;brand=mtp#an1>

March 28 and 29 - Chickering Hall, New York, NY - "Roughing It"
See SLC to James Redpath, 17 March 1876., Hartford, Conn. (UCCL 01314), n. 2. 2007. <http://www.marktwainproject.org/xtf/view?docId=letters/UCCL01314.xml;style=letter;brand=mtp#an2>

March 30 - Academy of Music, Brooklyn, New York - "Roughing It in the Land of the Big Bonanza"
Reported in Brooklyn Eagle, March 31, 1876, p. 3
The newspaper stated the lecture was at 1:30 pm and the audience was small. Agent Redpath came out before Twain appeared and asked the audience to move closer to the better seats in the parquette.
See SLC to James Redpath, 17 March 1876., Hartford, Conn. (UCCL 01314), n. 2. 2007. <http://www.marktwainproject.org/xtf/view?docId=letters/UCCL01314.xml;style=letter;brand=mtp#an2>

March 30 - New York Press Club, New York - recitation, probably "Roughing It"
Reported in Boston Globe, March 31, 1876, p. 5

March 31 - Chickering Hall, New York, NY - "Roughing It"
See SLC to James Redpath, 17 March 1876., Hartford, Conn. (UCCL 01314), n. 2. 2007. <http://www.marktwainproject.org/xtf/view?docId=letters/UCCL01314.xml;style=letter;brand=mtp#an2>

April 26 & 27 - Dramatic Hall, Hartford, Connecticut - performance in role of Peter Spyk in the play "Loan of a Lover" - text not available
See Mark Twain's Letters, 1876-1880, An Electronic Edition, Volume 1: 1876, 28 April 1876 to William Franklin, 4 May 1876 to Augustin Daly, and 5 May 1876 to Moncure Conway which indicates that Twain "rewrote the part." Also see two articles in Hartford Daily Courant dated April 27, p. 2 "The Amateur Theatricals" and April 28, p. 2 "The Amateur Stage."

July 1 - Congress of Authors, Independence Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - Reading "Francis Lightfoot Lee of Virginia"
See Mark Twain's Letters, 1876-1880, An Electronic Edition, Volume 1: 1876, Letter 23 February 23, 1876 to Frank Etting and 24 June 1876 to William S. Stokley

September 30 - Political Meeting, Hartford, Connecticut - Speech on Rutherford B. Hayes.
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 97-99.

November 13 - Academy of Music, Brooklyn, New York - Readings
Mark Twain read "The McWilliamses and the Membranous Croup," "My Late Senatorial Secretaryship," and "Encounter With an Interviewer." Also on the program were Emma Thursby, a well-known operatic soprano, and a group of singers called the Young Apollo Club.

From Budd's update:
November 14 - Academy of Music, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - Reading
Highly similar to November 13 performance in Brooklyn. See advertisements in Philadelphia Public Ledger, 13 and 14 November, p. 1.

November 21 - Music Hall, Boston, Massachusetts - Readings
Highly similar to November 13 performance in Brooklyn.
See Boston Daily Globe, "The Mark Twain Combination," November 20, 1876, p. 5
See Boston Daily Globe, "On the Platform," November 22, 1876, p. 8

November 22 - Academy of Music, Chelsea, Massachusetts - Readings
Highly similar to November 13 performance in Brooklyn.

November 24 - Providence, Rhode Island - Readings
Highly similar to November 13 performance in Brooklyn, New York.

December 14 - Union's Fair, Hartford, Connecticut - Auctioneer for sale of Jabberwocks - stories
Reported in the Hartford Courant, December 14, 1876, p. 2, "The Sale of the Jabberwocks." The article reported as follows: The remarkable collection of subterranean creatures, known as the Jabberwocks, now on exhibition at the Union's fair, are to be sold at auction this evening by Mark Twain as auctioneer. They were found underground and recognized almost by accident, it must have been, at first, but now that their identity is made known, they are evidently what they are. Mr. Clemens will explain the history of the "Beamish Boy Galumping Home," afford an opportunity to secure the "Momerath Outgrubing," and the "Slithy Tove upon a Tumtum Tree," and suggest points in the biography of the "Freemious Bandersnatch," and so forth. The Mud March Hare and the Mock Turtle that wept to think it was not a real turtle may also be had for a price.

December 22 - New England Society Dinner, New York City - "The Weather"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 100-103.

Ca. 1876
Asylum Hill Church, Hartford, Connecticut - Reading from The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

1877
January 26
- Mission Circle, Asylum Hill Congregational Church, Hartford, Connecticut - Auctioneer - Stories - text not available
The Hartford Daily Courant of January 25, 1877, p. 2 in an article titled "A Package Party" reported the entertainment would depend upon the auctioneer and that Mark Twain was scheduled to officiate in that capacity.

From Budd's update:
February 6 - Press Club, Steinway Hall, New York City - Readings - "Encounter with an Interviewer" and "Dueling Experiences"
The New York Times of February 7, p. 5 reported he read "Encounter with an Interviewer" and his "Dueling Experiences," which kept the audience in constant laughter. The New York Tribune of the same date, p. 8 also reported on the speech.

March 26 - Monday Evening Club, Hartford, Connecticut - "Advantages of Travel" - text not available

July 31 - Opening of Ah Sin, Fifth Avenue Theatre, New York City - Curtain Speech
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 103-105.

October 2 - Putnam Phalanx Dinner, Hartford, Connecticut - Dinner Speech
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 106-109.
Also reported in The New York Times, October 7, 1877

December 12 - Seminary Hall, Hartford, Connecticut - Introducing William Dean Howells
Howells was appearing on the Seminary Hall Lecture Course. Of Mark Twain's introduction, the Hartford Times, December 13, 1877, gives a fragment: "The gentleman who is now to address you is the editor of the Atlantic Monthly. He has a reputation in the literary world which I need not say anything about. I am only here to back up his moral character."

December 17 - John G. Whittier Birthday Dinner, Hotel Brunswick, Boston, Massachusetts - Dinner Speech
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 110-114.

1878
January 26 - Geselischaft Harmonic, New York City - Speech - text not available

February 25 - Press Club, New York City - Speech - text not available

April 4 - Bayard Taylor Dinner, New York City - Dinner Speech.
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 116-118.

July 4 - Anglo-American Club, Heidelberg - German-English Speech.
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 116-118.

November 30 - Artists Club, Munich, Germany - Speech or Story - text not available
In Notebook 13, October 13, 1878 - January 1879, MTP, Mark Twain comments briefly on this "blowout" for Toby Rosenthal, American expatriate painter, chiefly on the speech of Consul Horstmann, who interpolated rhymed doggerel, each stanza ending with "Toby Rosenthal.

December 31 - American Artists Club, Munich, Germany - Reading - "The Invalid's Story"
A letter from SLC to Joseph Twichell dated 26 January 1879 mentions giving the narrative about the Limburger cheese and a box of guns.
See Mark Twain's Letters, 1876-1880, An Electronic Edition, Volume 4: 1879.
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 122-124.

1879
March 31 - Stanley Club Dinner, Paris - Reading - "The Invalid's Story"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 122-124.

Spring - Stomach Club, Paris - "Some Thoughts on the Science of Onanism"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 125-127.

October 16 - Introducing General Hawley, Republican Meeting, Elmira, New York - Speech
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 128-129.
From Budd:
A text closer to the event is in Elmira Daily Advertiser, rpt. in Mark Twain in Elmira, ed. Robert D. Jerome and Herbert A. Wisbey, Jr., pp. 75-77.

November 12 - Army of the Tennessee Reunion, Haverly's Theatre, Chicago, Illinois - Impromptu remarks
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 130.

November 13 - Army of the Tennessee Reunion Banquet, Palmer House, Chicago, Illinois - "The Babies"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 131-133.

November 14 - Founding of Press Club, Chicago, Illinois - Speech - text not available
According to Paul Fatout, a letter from A. L. Hardy to Mark Twain, MTP, says that after the reunion banquet at the Palmer House, about fifty men gathered in the underground cafe of Captain Jim Simms on Clark Street. There were sandwiches, wurst, pretzels, beer, ale, Scotch, and a great deal of talk, Mark Twain acting as a sort of chairman at the head of the table. By dawn only seven remained. A note scrawled on the letter by Mark Twain, evidently one of the stayers, says that the Chicago Press Club was founded that night about seven in the morning.

November 14 - Breakfast for Mark Twain, Chicago, Illinois - Speech - text not available
According to Paul Fatout, the menu, MTP, says that this breakfast was tendered "By a few Chicago journalists," that the time was 12 noon, and that the bill of fare was: Fruit, Oysters on shell, Broiled Salmon Chateaubriand, with Champignons; French Fried Potatoes, Calves' Sweetbreads with French Peas, Spanish Omelette, Cutlets of Chicken, cream sauce; Broiled Quail on Toast, French Coffee, Cognac.

November 30 - Decorative Art Society, home of Mrs. Samuel Colt, Hartford, Connecticut - Reading - text not available

November 30 - Saturday Morning Club, Hartford, Connecticut - "Plagiarism"

December 3 - Atlantic Monthly Breakfast for Oliver Wendall Holmes, Boston, Massachusetts - Speech
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 134-136.

1880
April 2 - unidentified function, Hartford, Connecticut - Reading - text not available
Mentioned in a letter from SLC to Orion Clemens, April 4, 1880
Mark Twain's Letters, Electronic Edition, Volume 5

April 5 - Monday Evening Club, Hartford, Connecticut - Reading - "Decay of the Art of Lying"

April 26 - Private reading, Hartford, Connecticut - "A Telephonic Conversation"
Mentioned without name in a letter from SLC to William Dean Howells, April 23, 1880
Mark Twain's Letters, Electronic Edition, Volume 5

June 5 -Grand Bazar for Union for Home Work, Hartford, Connecticut - Auctioneer for sale of Jabberwocks - stories
The Hartford Daily Courant of June 7, 1880, p. 2 in a story titled "The Bazar" reported that Mr. Clemens "after successfully disposing of a number of articles in Booth J. generously offered to dispose of the booth itself and all the people in it, including himself, but as no satisfactory offers were made the lot was withdrawn."

October 16 - Hartford, Connecticut - Welcome to General Grant
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 136-138.

October 26 - Hartford Opera House, Republican Rally, Hartford, Connecticut - Political Speech
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 138-144.

bef. October 29 - German Republican Meeting, Second ward, Hawley Club room, Hartford, Connecticut - Speech - text not available
The Hartford Daily Courant of October 29, 1880, p. 2 in an article titled "German Republican Meeting" reported that President Maerklein presided at the meeting. Judge Sherman Adams spoke in German; Mr. George H. Woods spoke in English; and "the principal speaker of the evening was Mark Twain, who made a capital speech in German, interspersed with American, which was received with great favor, eliciting frequent demonstrations of approval."

November 2 - Hartford Opera House, Republican Jollification, Hartford, Connecticut - "Funeral Oration"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 146-147.

November 6 - Middlesex Club, Boston, Massachusetts - Speech - "Abou Bill Barnum"

December 10 - Opera House, Hartford, Connecticut - Introducing Robert Burdette - text not available
Robert Burdette of the Burlington Hawkeye was introduced by Mark Twain according to a report in the Hartford Daily Courant. In the Courant article of December 11, 1880, p. 1 titled "Burdette's Lecture" it was reported that "He was introduced by Mr. Clemens, in a few complimentary words, as one whose wit was without bitterness and whose much quoted paragraphs had a manly and honest ring."

December 20 - Tile Club, Francis Hopkinson Smith Studio, New York City - Speech or Stories - text not available

1881
February 24
- Papyrus Club Dinner, Revere House, Boston, Massachusetts - Dinner Speech
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 148-150.

February 25 - Twichell's Chapel, Hartford, Massachusetts - "Tar Baby" - text not available
Mentioned in letter from Joseph Twichell to SLC, February 16, 1881
Mentioned in a letter from SLC to William Dean Howells, February 21, 1881
Mark Twain-Howells Letters, Volume 1, edited by Henry Nash Smith and William M. Gibson, Belknap Press, 1960, p. 356.
The Letters of Mark Twain and Joseph Hopkins Twichell, edited by Harold K. Bush, Steve Courtney, and Peter Messent, 2017, p. 104.

February 28 - West Point, New York. Readings - "Clarence and Eugene," "How I Escaped Being Killed in a Duel," "Cure for Stammering"
See Philip Leon's Mark Twain and West Point, ECW Press, 1996.

March 10 - Negro Church (Talcott Street Church?), Hartford, Connecticut. Readings - "Tar Baby" - text not available.
Mentioned in a letter from SLC to William Dean Howells, February 21, 1881
Mark Twain-Howells Letters, Volume 1, edited by Henry Nash Smith and William M. Gibson, Belknap Press, 1960, p. 356.

June 8 - Army of the Potomac Banquet, Allyn House, Hartford, Connecticut - "The Benefit of Judicious Training"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 151-154.

November 17 - Introducing Archibald Forbes, Allyn House, Hartford, Connecticut - Introductory Speech
Published in Hartford Daily Courant, November 18, 1881, p. 2, "The War Correspondent"
Online at: http://www.twainquotes.com/Forbes.html

November 21 - Monday Evening Club, Hartford, Connecticut - Reading - "Phrenography" - text not available

December 8 - Dinner for Mark Twain, Windsor Hotel, Montreal, Canada - Dinner Speech
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 157-160.

December 22 - New England Society, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - "Plymouth Rock and the Pilgrims"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 162-165.


1882
January 31
- Frechette Dinner, Holyoke, Massachusetts - "On After-Dinner Speaking"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 166-168.

February 24 - Asylum Hill Congregational Church, Hartford, Connecticut - Reading - text not available
Reported in Hartford Daily Courant, February 25, 1882, p. 3, "Additional City News"

April 15 - Saturday Morning Club, Boston, Massachusetts. Reading - "Advice to Youth"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 169-171.

October 19 - Allyn Hall, Reception for Worcester Continentals, Hartford, Connecticut - Speech - "City of Hartford"
Published in Hartford Daily Courant, October 20, 1882, p. 2, "The Visiting Soldiery"
Online at: http://www.twainquotes.com/Hartford.html

November 4 - Papyrus Club, Boston, Massachusetts - Speech - text not available
Reported in Hartford Daily Courant, November 6, 1882, p. 2, "City Briefs"

December 22 - New England Society, Delmonico's, New York City - "Woman - God Bless Her"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 173-175.


1883
February 19
- Monday Evening Club, Hartford, Connecticut - Reading - "What is Happiness? - this text became the basis for What Is Man?

March (?) The Kinsmen, New York City - Speech - text not available
According to Paul Fatout, the Kinsmen was a club without dues, clubhouse, officers or bylaws. It was established by Lawrence Barrett, the name suggested by Laurence Hutton to symbolize practitioners of kindred arts who made up the membership. Mark Twain attended as the guest of Hutton in 1883. Other Kinsmen, American and British, were William Dean Howells, Frank D. Millet, T. B. Aldrich, H. C. Bunner, E. A. Abbey, Anthony Hope, Edwin Booth, Brander Matthews, Joe Jefferson, August St. Gaudens, Pinero, Bram Stoker, Forbes Robertson, John Singer Sargent, Henry Irving, Julian Hawthorne, Andrew Lang, and Edmund Gosse. For further information, see Laurence Hutton's, Talks in a Library, page 326-28 and Brander Matthews, The Tocsin of Revolt, page 255.

March 5 - Billiards Exhibition, New York City - Speech introducing Maurice Vignaux
Text published in New York Sun, March 6, 1883.
Online at: http://www.twainquotes.com/Billiards.html

April 4 - Unity Hall, Hartford, Connecticut - Introducing George W. Cable
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 176-177.

April 4 - Supper for George W. Cable, Hartford Club, Hartford, Connecticut - Speech - text not available
Of this late party Cable remarked upon an "abundance of innocent fun. There were a hundred good things said that I suppose I'll never remember." Also see Laurence Hutton's, Talks in a Library, pp. 416-18.

April 5 - Saturday Morning Club, Hartford, Connecticut - Introducing George W. Cable
See George W. Cable, His Life and Letters, edited by Lucy Bikle, Charles Scribner's Sons, 1928, p. 97.

May 23 - Royal literary and Scientific Society, Ottawa, Canada - "On Adam"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 178-180.

May 27 - Rideau Hall, Ottawa, Canada - Readings - text not available

June 7 - Decorative Art Society, home of Mrs. Franklin Whitmore, Farmington Avenue, Hartford, Connecticut - Reading - text not available
According to the Hartford Daily Courant, June 8, 1883, p. 2, "City Briefs" Twain gave a series of readings from his own writings to about 150 members and friends of the Decorative Art Society.

December 4 - Union for Home Work, Authors' Carnival, Hartford, Connecticut - Actor in role from a Dickens novel - text not available
According to the Hartford Daily Courant, December 5, 1883, p. 2 in an article titled "The Authors' Carnival" -- The second event of the evening was the presentation on the large stage of a scene from Charles Dickens's "Leo Hunter." It introduced a number of clever ladies and gnetlemen who not only acted their parts, but lent to it the dialogue. The principals, Miss Hamersley and Mr. Prentice, were roundly applauded, and when Mark Twain came on the stage as a character in the scene, plaudits rang from one end of the enormous hall to the other. This scene alone was enough to compensate one for the expense of the entire evening's entertainment.


1884
February 4
- Monday Evening Club, Hartford, Connecticut - Reading - "Southern Literature" - text not available

April 14 - Monday Evening Club, Hartford, Connecticut - Reading - Unfinished Paper to be Completed by Each Member - text not available

April 29 - Breakfast for Edwin Booth, New York City - Speech - text not available

September 16 or 17(conjectural) - Banquet of Wheelmen, Springfield, Massachusetts - Dinner Speech
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 181.
Note: This date is in question. Although the speech was written for such an occasion, SLC was in Elmira, NY during this time frame.

October (?) - Mugwump Rally, Hartford, Connecticut - "Turncoats"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 182-184.

October 20 - Mugwump Rally, Allyn Hall, Hartford, Connecticut - Remarks as Chairman
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 186-187.

November (?) "Mock Oration on the Dead Partisan" - unknown whether or not this speech was ever delivered
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 188-189.

November 5- February 28, 1885 - Tour with George Washington Cable - over 100 engagements. Twain read and delivered passages from numerous works including Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Also see B. Scott Holmes's website "Promoting Huck Finn: The Twain-Cable Tour of 1884/85" for in depth information and reviews on this tour including maps and photos of the venues.

Also see Steve Railton's website at the University of Virginia for more details on this tour.

Under the management of James B. Pond, the following cities were included on the tour:
November 5
- Opera House, New Haven, Connecticut
November 6 - Music Hall, Orange, New Jersey - "A Telephonic Conversation," "Col. Sellers in a New Role," "Col. Sellers Redux," "A Dazzling Achievement," "Tragic Tale of the Fishwife," "A Trying Situation," "A Ghost Story," and "A Sure Cure"
November 7 - Gilmore's Opera House, Springfield, Massachusetts - "Tragic Tale of the Fishwife," "Col. Sellers in a New Role," "A Trying Situation," "A Ghost Story"
November - 8 - Blackstone Hall, Providence, Rhode Island
November 10 - Town Hall, Melrose, Massachusetts - "Toast to the Babies" and "A Ghost Story"
November 11 - Huntington Hall, Lowell, Massachusetts - "Toast to the Babies," "Encounter with an Interviewer," "King Sollermun," "Tragic Tale of the Fishwife," "A Trying Situation” and “A Ghost Story"
November 12 - Rumford Hall, Waltham, Massachusetts
November 13 - Music Hall, Boston, Masschusetts
November 14 - Brockton, Massachusetts
November 17 - Plainfield, New Jersey - "Digging for the Facts," "Tragic Tale of the Fishwife," "A Trying Situation," "Why I Lost the Editorship," "A Ghost Story," and "Cure for Stuttering"
November 18 - Chickering Hall, New York City - "King Sollermun," "Tragic Tale of the Fishwife," "A Trying Situation," and "A Ghost Story"
November 19 (first performance)
Chickering Hall, New York City - "King Sollermun," "Tragic Tale of the Fishwife," "A Trying Situation," "A Ghost Story," "A Sure Cure," and "Jim's Bank"
November 19 (second performance) Chickering Hall, New York City - "Encounter with an Interviewer," "Col. Sellers in a New Role," "How I Lost the Editorship," "A Sure Cure," and "Jim's Bank"
Reviewed in The New York Times, November 19, 1884
November 20 - Opera House, Newburgh, New York - "King Sollermun," "Tragic Tale of the Fishwife," "A Trying Situation," and "A Ghost Story"
November 21 - Association Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - "King Sollermun," "Tragic Tale of the Fishwife," "A Trying Situation," and "A Ghost Story"
November 22 (two performances) - Academy of Music, Brooklyn, New York - "Encounter with an Interviewer," "Buck Fanshaw's Funeral," "Col. Sellers in a New Role," "A Sure Cure," "How I Lost the Editorship," and "A Ghost Story"
November 24 & 25 - Congregational Church, Washington, D.C. (President Chester A. Arthur was in attendance.) - "Tragic Tale of the Fishwife," "King Sollermun," "Encounter with an Interviewer," "Col. Sellers in a New Role," and "A Ghost Story"
November 26(first performance) - Association Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - "Encounter with an Interviewer," "Certain Personal Episodes," "How I Lost the Editorship," and "A Sure Cure"
November 26(second performance) - Association Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - "King Sollermun," "Tragic Tale of the Fishwife," "A Trying Situation," and "A Ghost Story"

Thanksgiving Day, November 27 was spent with Thomas Nast in Morristown, New Jersey.

November 28 & 29 - Academy of Music, Baltimore, Maryland. (The Nov. 28 performance included a reading of "The Tragic Tale of the Fishwife")
December 1 - Town Hall, Adams, Massachusetts
December 2 - Music Hall, Troy, New York
December 3 - Wilgus Opera House, Ithaca, New York
December 4 - Grand Opera House, Syracuse, New York
December 5 - Opera House, Utica, New York
December 6 (two performances) - Academy of Music, Rochester, New York

December 7 - Elks Lodge, New Osburn house, Rochester, New York - speech. Text not available.
Mark Twain and his manager James B. Pond were guests of the Rochester Elks Lodge. According to a report titled "The Elks' Social," in the Rochester Democrat & Chronicle, 8 December 1884, p. 6, "Mark Twain entertained the assemblage for some time by relating some of his personal experiences..." Text recovered by Leslie Myrick.

December 8 - Horticulture Gardens Pavilion, Toronto, Canada
December 9 - Horticulture Gardens Pavilion, Toronto, Canada
December 10 - Concert Hall, Buffalo, New York - "Personal Episodes," "A Ghost Story," and "King Sollermun"
December 11
- Concert Hall, Buffalo, New York - "Encounter with an Interviewer," "Certain Personal Episodes," "How I Lost the Editorship," and "A Sure Cure"
December 12 - University Hall, Ann Arbor, Michigan
December 13 - Powers' Opera House, Grand Rapids, Michigan
December 15 - Opera House, Toledo, Ohio
December 16 - Whitney's, Detroit, Michigan
December 17 - Case Hall, Cleveland, Ohio - "Personal Anecdote," "A Ghost Story," and Selections from Huckleberry Finn

Christmas Recess

December 29 - Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania - "Tragic Tale of the Fishwife" and Infestation of Phelps' cabin with snakes and rats
December 30 - Grand Opera House, Dayton, Ohio
December 31 - Hamilton, Ohio

1885

Under the management of Ozias Pond, brother of James B. Pond:
January 1 - Court House, Paris, Kentucky
January 2 - Odeon Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio - "A Dazzling Achievement," "Tragic Tale of the Fishwife," and "A Trying Situation"
January 3 (first performance)
- Odeon Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio - "King Sollermun," "Tragic Tale of the Fishwife," and "A Trying Situation"
January 3 (second performance) - Odeon Hall, Cincinnati, Ohio - "Personal Episodes," "How I Lost the Editorship," and Selection
January 5 - Leiderkranz Hall, Louisville, Kentucky - Certain Personal Episodes, "How I Lost the Editorship," and Selection
January 6
- Leiderkranz Hall, Louisville, Kentucky
January 7 - Plymouth Church, Indianapolis, Indiana - "Dick Baker's Cat"
January 8 - Chatterton's Opera House, Springfield, Illinois
January 9 & 10 - Mercantile Library Hall , St. Louis, Missouri - "King Sollermun," "Tragic Tale of the Fishwife," "A Trying Situation," and "A Ghost Story"
January 12 - Opera House, Quincy, Illinois
January 13 - Hannibal, Missouri
January 14 - Opera House, Keokuk, Iowa
January 15 - Opera House, Burlington, Iowa
January 16 & 17 (two performances on the 17th) Central Music Hall, Chicago, Illinois
January 19 - Methodist Church, Evanston, Illinois - "King Sollermun," "Tragic Tale of the Fishwife," and "A Trying Situation"
January 20 - Opera House, Janesville, Wisconsin
January 21 - Methodist Church, Madison, Wisconsin
January 22 - Opera House, La Crosse, Wisconsin - "King Sollermun," "Tragic Tale of the Fishwife," "A Trying Situation" and "A Ghost Story"
January 23 - Market Hall, St. Paul, Minnesota
January 24(two performances) - The Grand Opera House, Minneapolis, Minnesota
January 26 - Philharmonic Hall, Winona, Minnesota
January 27 - Methodist Church basement, Madison, Wisconsin
January 29 (two performances) - Academy of Music, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
January 30 - Opera House, Rockford, Illinois
January 31 - Burtis Opera House, Davenport, Iowa - "King Sollermun," "A Trying Situation," and "A Ghost Story"

Under the management again of James B. Pond
February 2 & 3 - Central Music Hall, Chicago, Illinois
February 4 - Opera House, South Bend, Indiana
February 5 - Academy of Music, Fort Wayne, Indiana
Reviewed in Ft. Wayne (IND) Daily Gazette on Feb. 6, 1885; additional comments in Ft. Wayne (IND) Sunday Gazette on Feb. 8, 1885
February 6 & 7(two performances on the 7th)- Plymouth Church, Indianapolis, Indiana
February 9 - Comstock's Opera House, Columbus, Ohio
February 10 - Opera House, Delaware, Ohio
February 11 - First Congregational Church, Oberlin, Ohio - "Some Personal Episodes," "Tragic Tale of the Fishwife," "A Trying Situation," "A Ghost Story," and "Incorporated Company of Mean Men"
February 12 - Whitney's, Detroit, Michigan - "Encounter with an Interviewer" and "A Dazzling Achievement"
February 13 - YMCA Hall, London, Canada
February 14 - Horticultural Gardens Pavilion, Toronto, Canada
February 16 - Grand Opera House, Brockville, Canada
February 17 - Opera House, Ottawa, Canada - selections from Huckleberry Finn, A Tramp Abroad and "The Jumping Frog
February 18 - Queen's Hall, Montreal, Canada - selections from Huckleberry Finn, “A Trying Situation” and “The Tragic Tale of a
Fishwife.”
February 18 - post performance speech at Tuque Bleue Snowshoe Club, Montreal Canada - impromptu speech.
See Guy Cardwell's Twins of Genius, p. 63.
Feburary 19 - Queen's Hall, Montreal, Canada - "Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer's Brilliant Achievement," "The Blue Jay," and "The Jumping Frog"
February 20 - Town Hall, Saratoga, New York - "Tragic Tale of the Fishwife," "A Trying Situation," and "A Ghost Story"
February 21 - Academy of Music, New York, New York - "Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer's Brilliant Achievement," "The Blue Jay's
Mistake," and "A Ghost Story"
February 23 - Opera House, New Haven, Connecticut (announced in New Haven Evening Register, February 18 and 21, and 23, 1885)
February 26 - Academy of Music, Philadelphia, Pa.
February 27 - Oratorio Hall, Baltimore, Maryland - "A Dazzling Achievement," "The Blue Jay's Mistake," "Jumping Frog," and "A Ghost Story"
February 28 - Congregational Church, Washington, D.C.

March 21 - Teachers' Association, Steinway Hall, New York City
Content of the speech was reported as "Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer's brilliant achievement," and the story about "the man who was blown up and 'docked' by the Mean Man's Company that employed him for the time he neglected his work while navigating space." Also "A Tragic Tale of a Fishwife" and "The Blue Jay's Mistake."
Reported in the New York Herald, 22 March 1885, p. 11.
Recovered by Leslie Myrick, of the Mark Twain Papers, 18 January 2011.

March 31 - Tile Club Dinner for Laurence Hutton, New York City - "On Speech-Making Reform"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 190-193.

April 9 - Actors Fund Fair, Academy of Music, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - Speech and readings
Some text published in Mark Twain Speaking, p. 194.
The New York Times on April 10, 1885 reported that Twain gave a reading "The Tragic Tale of the Fishwife." The Philadelphia Public Ledger and Daily Transcript of April 10, 1885 also reported that Twain read "The Tragic Tale of the Fishwife."

April 9 - Clover Club, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - Dinner Speech - text not available.

April 28 - American Copyright League Benefit, New York City - Reading - text not available.

April 29 - Authors Readings, Madison Square Theater, New York City - Reading "Trying Situation" - text not available
At this matinee performance Mark Twain startled everybody by appearing in formal evening dress. As reported by the World next day he explained: "I knew it would he night before they reached me, and so I came in evening dress." From Madison Square Garden he went on to a dinner of Cornell alumni at Morelli's.

April 29 - Cornell Alumni Dinner, New York City - Dinner Speech - text not available

May 1 - Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York - Reading - "Trying Situation" and "Golden Arm"

June 5 and 6 - Art Society Benefit, Hartford, Connecticut - Readings - "King Sollermun," "German Lesson," "Trying Situation," "Short Story"

October 7 - Monday Evening Club, Pittsfield, Massachusetts - Reading - "Mental Telegraphy"

November 19 - White House, Washington, D.C. - Impromptu speech on copyright - text not available
According to Fatout, in Notebook 20, August 20, 1885 - January 20, 1886, MTP, Mark Twain says that, accompanied by Johnson of the Century and George Walton Green of the Authors Copyright League, he called on President Cleveland and "wandered into a speech" on international copyright, which evolved into a spirited discussion by all four. The president promised to stress the subject in his next message to Congress.

From Budd's update:
Late December - Kent Club, Yale Law School, New Haven, Connecticut - Speech - text not available
Mentioned in Shelley Fisher Fishkin's Lighting Out for the Territory, pp. 103-104.

1886
January 18
- Typothetae Dinner, Delmonico's, New York City - "The Compositor"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 200-202.
From Budd's update:
See a possibly better text in American Bookmaker, 2 (Feb. 1886), pp. 55-56.

January 28 & 29 - Senate Committee, Washington, D.C. - Remarks on Copyright
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 206-209.

March 22 - Monday Evening Club, Hartford, Connecticut - "Knights of Labor" also titled "The New Dynasty"
Published in Mark Twain, Collected Tales, Sketches, Speeches, & Essays, 1852-1890, Library of America, 1992, pp. 883-890.

April 3 - West Point, New York - Readings - "The Awful German Language," "An American Party," and "Jumping Frog"
Published in Mark Twain & West Point, pp. 158-195.

April 22 - Authors Club, Gilsey House, New York City - Reading - "Our Children"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 210-211.
Budd:
See a differing summary in "Our New York Letter," Literary World (Boston), 17 (May 1886) 152; perhaps Twain spoke twice, once truly impromptu.

May 6 - West Point, New York - Readings - text not available

July 3 - Rand Park, Keokuk, Iowa Speech
Printed in the Keokuk Weekly Constitution, July 7, 1886, page 1.
Online at: http://www.twainquotes.com/July4-1886.html

July 21 - Reformatory, Elmira, New York. Readings - "German," "Whistling," "Trying Situation," "King Sollermun"
From Budd's update:
For a first-hand account see The Summary, 4 (25 July 1886) - the inhouse weekly.

October 11 - Monday Evening Club, Home of Henry Robinson, Hartford, Connecticut - Reading - "A Protest Against Taking the Pledge" - text not available

November 6 - Saturday Morning Club, Hartford, Connecticut - Reading or Remarks - text not available

November 11 - Military Service Institution, Governors Island, New York - "Yankee Smith of Camelot"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 211-213.

November 29 - Authors Readings, New York City - Reading - text not available

December 9 - Tremont Temple, Boston, Massachusetts - Introducing Henry M. Stanley
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 214-215.

1887
February 10
- Stationers Board of Trade, Hotel Brunswick, New York City - Dinner Speech - "English as She is Taught"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 216-218.

February 26 - Monday Evening Club, Hartford, Connecticut - "Machine Culture" - text not available

March 17 - The Kinsmen, New York City - Speech - text not available
According to Paul Fatout, the Kinsmen was a club without dues, clubhouse, officers or bylaws. It was established by Lawrence Barrett, the name suggested by Laurence Hutton to symbolize practitioners of kindred arts who made up the membership. Mark Twain attended as the guest of Hutton in 1883. Other Kinsmen, American and British, were William Dean Howells, Frank D. Millet, T. B. Aldrich, H. C. Bunner, E. A. Abbey, Anthony Hope, Edwin Booth, Brander Matthews, Joe Jefferson, August St. Gaudens, Pinero, Bram Stoker, Forbes Robertson, John Singer Sargent, Henry Irving, Julian Hawthorne, Andrew Lang, and Edmund Gosse. For further information, see Laurence Hutton's, Talks in a Library, page 326-28 and Brander Matthews, The Tocsin of Revolt, page 255.

March 31 - Authors Readings for Longfellow Memorial, Boston, Massachusetts. - "English as She is Taught"

March 31 - Kent Club, Yale, New Haven, Connecticut - "English as She is Taught"
Mark Twain's scheduled appearance was reported in the New Haven Register, March 31, 1887, p. 4.

April 1 - Gymnasium Exhibition, Trinity College, Hartford, Connecticut - Speech
Text published in Hartford Daily Courant, April 2, 1887, p. 3, "The Gymnasium Exhibition."
Text online at: http://www.twainquotes.com/Gymnastics.html

April 8 - Union Veterans Association of Maryland Banquet, Baltimore, Maryland - "An Author's Soldiering"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 219-221.

April 13 - Supper for John Drew and Ada Rehan, Daly's Theatre, New York City - Supper Speech
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 222-224.

April 27 - Army and Navy Club of Connecticut, Central Hall, Hartford, Connecticut - Dinner Speech
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 225-227.

From Budd's update::
April 30 - U.S. Military Academy, West Point, New York - Reading - "English as She Is Taught"
See Philip W. Leon, Mark Twain & West Point, p. 137.

November 28 - Authors Readings, Chickering Hall, New York City - "Fatal Anecdote" - text not available

December 5 - Monday Evening Club, Hartford, Connecticut - Reading - "Consistency" - text not available

December 20 - Congregationalist Club, Music Hall, Boston, Massachusetts. "Post-prandial Oratory"
Published in Mark Twain Speaking, pp. 230-234.

December 31 - Authors Club, Watch Night, New York City - Story - text not available


1888
January 6
- Founding of Players Club, Delmonico's, New York City - Speech - text not available
Prime movers were Edwin Booth and Augustin Daly. Among charter members who gathered at Delmonico's were Mark Twain, William Bispham, Lawrence Barrett, John Drew, Laurence Hutton, Joe Jefferson, Brander Matthews, Stephen H. Olin, General Sherman.

February 3 - Yale Alumni Association, Seminary Hall, Hartford, Connecticut - two readings - "The Burial of Buck Fanshaw" and"Encounter with an Interviewer"
Reported in New Haven Evening Register, February 4, 1888, p. 4 which stated, "Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain) was then introduced by President Twichell, who siad that he need not feel afraid, as he was among his friends. Mr. Clemens first took occassion to pay a worthy tribute to Mr. Twichell's personal beauty, and said that no crown ever graced a head as kingly as the prohibiton gray locks of the esteemed president."

February 27 - Historical Class, Hartford, Connecticut. Reading or Remarks - text not available

March 17 - Soldiers Home, Washington, D.C. - Reading - text not available

March 17 - Authors Readings to aid international copyright - Congregational Church, Washington, D.C. - text not available
According to the Boston Globe of March 18, p. 1, Mrs. Grover Cleveland was in attendance. Readers were Mark Twain, Richard Watson Gilder, Dr. Edward Eggleston, J. Whitcomb Riley, Colonel Thomas Knox and William Dean Howells. The readers were introduced by E. C. Stedman.
According to the

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